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innovation DAILY

Here we highlight selected innovation related articles from around the world on a daily basis.  These articles related to innovation and funding for innovative companies, and best practices for innovation based economic development.

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While home in Kansas City for the season, BioTalk host Rich Bendis virtually sits down two local business leaders. Innar Health CEO, Chris Mathia, and Flyover Capital Managing Partner, Keith Molzer chat about the opportunities and challenges of BioHealth and Fund-Raising in Middle American.

Listen now via Google http://bit.ly/39ikNss, Apple http://apple.co/3shRRtk, Spotify http://spoti.fi/39ocgUz, and TuneIn http://bit.ly/2XvT0za.

 

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US Flag flowing in the breeze against a blue sky

Now that Trump has been edged out of office, Joe Biden may emerge as the harbinger of a brighter, better blue future or as a version of Konstantin Chernenko, the aged timeserver who ran the Soviet Union in its dying days. To succeed, he will have to confront massive pessimism about America’s direction, with some 80 percent thinking the country is out of control. The Atlantic last year compared the U.S. to a “failed state,” while The Week predicts “dark days ahead.”

 

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LHBR Staff/uncoveredlens/Pexelseaders today need to revisit an overlooked skill: asking questions. In my 40 years as an executive and advisor in Silicon Valley, I’ve often seen leaders assume that people look to them for answers — bold assertions that build people’s confidence in their competence. But in reality, that kind of approach erodes trust, especially at a time when so much is manifestly uncertain. You think you have the answers to all important questions? That suggests that you are either clueless — you have no idea how rapidly the world is changing — or that you are lying. In either case, you won’t find that trust that you’ve been looking for.

Image: HBR Staff/uncoveredlens/Pexels

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Warren Buffett - From Wikipedia

A key lesson we can learn from Warren Buffett, is about how to think about a potential stock investment in the context of a long-term time horizon. Every investor in a stock has a choice: bite our fingernails over the short-term ups and downs that are inevitable with the stock market, or, zero in on stocks we are comfortable to simply buy and hold for the long haul — maybe even a twenty year holding period. Heck, investors can even choose to completely ignore the stock market’s short-run quotations and instead go into their initial investment planning to hold on for years and years regardless of the fluctuations in price that might occur next.

 

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Money and Piggy Bank

Many first-time entrepreneurs find themselves unable to bootstrap their startups, and also unable to find early funding at the venture capital level or even with angel investors. Their only recourse is that first tier of investors, fondly called Friends, Family and Fools. These are the only people likely to believe in newbies, with only minimal product evidence or business experience.

Image: https://blog.startupprofessionals.com

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Sick ... person holding thermometer.

As coronavirus cases overwhelm hospitals, and every state is considered a "danger zone," knowing if you have the highly contagious virus is key. Who better to consult than Johns Hopkins, the private research university in Baltimore, Maryland, which has been on the forefront of tracking COVID-19 since it hit these shores? "Symptoms can begin between two and 14 days after you have been infected with the coronavirus," advises the university. "The most common symptoms are" the following. Read on—and to ensure your health and the health of others, don't miss these Sure Signs You've Already Had Coronavirus. 

 

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In the last few years I have seen a popular business model emerging which embodies a greater focus on social and environmental responsibility, and a new requirement for trust and sharing, as well as customer and community collaboration. Companies like Airbnb, Uber, Zappos, and Whole Foods are setting the example, and leading the way in profitability and purpose.

Image: https://blog.startupprofessionals.com

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vaccine

In this article, we are going to list the 15 largest vaccine companies in the world. Click to skip ahead and jump to the 5 largest vaccine companies in the world. Vaccination is the most simple and effective way of prevention of many diseases. It provides immunity to infectious diseases and it is the most cost-effective method to protect the world population. The first-ever vaccine was introduced for smallpox to treat the deadly cowpox virus in 1796. This virus killed many people and developing a vaccine for it saved many lives. But the concept of vaccines existed even before 1796. Pharmaceutical companies around the globe have worked to develop vaccines for diseases such as Malaria, HIV, cholera, influenza and tuberculosis.

 

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BioNTech co-founders Dr. Ugur Sahin and Dr. Ozlem Tureci in its headquarters in Germany on Jan. 3. Photograph by Dina Litovsky—Redux for TIME

“No!” The doctor snapped. “Look at me!”

I had been staring her in the eyes, as she had ordered, but when a doctor on my other side began jabbing me with a needle, I started to turn my head. “Don’t look at it,” the first doctor said. I obeyed.

This was in early August in New Orleans, where I had signed up to be a participant in the clinical trial for the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine. It was a blind study, which meant I was not supposed to know whether I had gotten the placebo or the real vaccine. I asked the doctor if I would really been able to tell by looking at the syringe. “Probably not,” she answered, “but we want to be careful. This is very important to get right.”

Image: BioNTech co-founders Dr. Ugur Sahin and Dr. Ozlem Tureci in its headquarters in Germany on Jan. 3. Photograph by Dina Litovsky—Redux for TIME

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Question mark on white background.

The Onion recently satirized the disjointed nature of information around the vaccine rollout, suggesting that the best shot at staying informed  is to cobble together information from Twitter accounts of “reporters, medical researchers, and politically engaged musicians… [and a] Tacoma-area mom who shares screenshots of vital information.”

 

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