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innovation DAILY

Here we highlight selected innovation related articles from around the world on a daily basis.  These articles related to innovation and funding for innovative companies, and best practices for innovation based economic development.

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Everyone in the business world has heard of the old bestseller by Geoffrey A. Moore titled “Crossing the Chasm,” but most entrepreneurs have no idea how it relates to them. In fact, it’s all about the “focus” required to get early stage technology products across the deadly chasm from early adopters to mainstream customers.

Image: http://blog.startupprofessionals.com 

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Kaplan University Logo

With a surprise deal to acquire the for-profit Kaplan University, announced on Thursday, Purdue University has leapfrogged into the thick of the competitive online-education market. Purdue plans to oversee the institution as a new piece of its public-university system — a free-standing arm that will cater to working adults and other nontraditional students.

The purchase, conceived and executed in just five and a half months, puts Purdue in position to become a major force in an online landscape increasingly dominated by nonprofit institutions. Until now, said Purdue’s president, Mitch Daniels, the university "has basically been a spectator to this growth" in distance education, with just a few online graduate programs.

 

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“It turns out when you eat together, you start planning more activities together.” (Photo: Bret Hartman/TED/Flickr)

More Americans are single than ever before, and more are living alone. That fact is one of the reasons we’re also starting to die earlier: one study found that living alone increases mortality risk 32%. Vivek Murthy, the former U.S. surgeon general, has called isolation the most common health issue in the country.

Architect Grace Kim thinks that a solution may be differently designed housing. “Loneliness can be the result of our built environment,” she told an audience at TED 2017.

Image: “It turns out when you eat together, you start planning more activities together.” (Photo: Bret Hartman/TED/Flickr)

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jeff boss

Entrepreneurship is a roller coaster of self. The self-confidence to try something different, the self-doubt as to whether or not you’ll succeed, the self-preservation of hustling every day. It’s a complete and utter mind game.

As an entrepreneur struggling to get ahead, it would be easier to get the cliff notes about what works and what doesn’t so you can adopt and apply them for yourself and save time. Unfortunately, it doesn’t work that way.

 

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Deloitte Logo

WASHINGTON, April 27, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- The Deloitte Foundation today announced a grant to Base 11 that will help create a nationally scalable STEM career accelerator model. The model will offer high school students a project-based learning program that encompasses multiple engineering disciplines.

The objective of the program is to encourage students who have an inherent interest in STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) to pursue a college degree in one of those fields and help alleviate the STEM workforce shortage. Research shows that experiential learning helps retain students' interest in the STEM fields that are the gateway to STEM degrees and careers.

 

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smart phone

When people talk about addiction, the first thing that comes to mind are illegal drugs, alcohol and tobacco. But in the mobile era, behavioral addiction is much more prevalent and pervasive — and the culprit is the ubiquitous smartphone. Adam Alter, a marketing and psychology professor at New York University, says it’s an addiction by design — and one that’s insidiously hard to break.

In his new book, Irresistible: The Rise of Addictive Technology and the Business of Keeping Us Hooked, he explains how humans are hardwired for addiction and offers suggestions on how to break the habit. He discussed his findings on the [email protected] show, which airs on SiriusXM channel 111.

 

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When California voters approved US$3 billion in funding for stem-cell research in 2004, biologists flocked to the state, and citizens dreamed of cures for Parkinson’s disease and spinal-cord injuries. Now, the pot of money — one of the biggest state investments in science — is running dry before treatments have emerged, raising questions about whether Californians will pour billions more into stem-cell research.

If they don’t, that could leave hundreds of scientists without support, and strand potentially promising therapies before they reach the market. “It’s an issue of great concern,” says Jonathan Thomas, chair of the board for the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM) in Oakland.

Image: Xianmin Zeng/Buck Inst. Nerve cells derived from human stem cells, in work supported by the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine.  

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robot

At a community college in upstate New York, 12 cafeteria workers recently learned that they will lose their jobs — and be replaced by self-serve machines. It's an issue that has played out in communities across the country, as robots get better and better at doing jobs — from taking fast food orders to mining coal — that once belonged to humans.

Is your job next? The answer to that question is complicated, according to a report by management consultant McKinsey, but most workers don't need to worry. Experts found that less than 5% of jobs can be completely replaced by technology, though nearly every job involves tasks that robots could learn to do.

 

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touchdown

When you run a startup you’re always on borrowed time. You have cash in the bank, a monthly burn rate and a “cash out” date that few in the company truly comprehend. I’ve never met a founder who wasn’t acutely aware of his or her ticking time bomb and the sense that failure and humiliation is a real possibility. It’s why so few can really start a business from scratch. It’s the ultimate in accountability and public judgment.

 

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mailboxes

How many hours a day do you spend sifting through your inbox? Does the idea of taking up arms against a sea of emails each morning feel hopeless? You aren’t alone. Some of the most productive people out there struggle with email—or used to, before coming up with some useful hacks and regimens to help them. Email may not be going away anytime soon (even the pros at group messaging companies like Slack and HipChat still rely on it for a few things), but there may be a few ways to make it more manageable. Here’s how some of the busiest execs keep their email time to a minimum.

 

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John Kilbourne, professor at Grand Valley State U., in Allendale, Mich., came to the March for Science in Washington, D.C., dressed as Galileo, the founder of modern physics and astronomy who was persecuted for standing by his scientific findings.

Marches supporting science were held around the world on April 22, the annual celebration of Earth Day. 

Image: http://www.chronicle.com 

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