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innovation DAILY

Here we highlight selected innovation related articles from around the world on a daily basis.  These articles related to innovation and funding for innovative companies, and best practices for innovation based economic development.

Syed Balkhi

There’s been a lot of talk in recent years about Millennials, but what about Generation Z? Gen Zers were born between 1995 and 2010, which means they’re either fairly new to the workforce (the oldest of the group being 24) or will be entering it in the near future. According to a joint study by management-consultants McKinsey and consumer-trend researchers Box 1824, Generation Z are digital natives, identity nomads, realistic, radically inclusive and want more dialogue and less confrontation. To prepare your company for this newest wave of workers, you’ve got to adapt, and here's how to best attract and retain top Gen Z talent. 

 

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young entrepreneur

What do you associate with entrepreneurship? When most people think of entrepreneurs, they think of money, fame and charisma. After all, the most successful entrepreneurs attract the most attention and usually possess these things. However, no matter how much an entrepreneur demonstrates an aura of effortlessness, I’ve found that there is a secret that ties all entrepreneurs together.

 

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network

Mention the word “networking,” and you might conjure repressed memories of awkward handshakes, disingenuous small talk and the utter dread of opening an email from a stranger who wants to “pick your brain.” Yet despite its unpleasant reputation, most people understand that networking is important, even vital. Connections are the steady undercurrent that powers the tech world, supercharging the careers of the founders, operators and investors who excel at cultivating them.

 

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future

Type “Internships are” into Google, and you’ll get a list of fill-in-the-blank predictive suggestions such as: Hard to get, slavery, important, illegal, scams, paid, boring, exploitative, stupid, and overrated. Tell us how you really feel, internet.

The fact that people actually search for those phrases may be a litmus test that reflects the generally sour sentiment surrounding internships as stale leftovers of the Devil Wears Prada-like nightmares and Monica Lewinsky linger.

 

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2019 R D Index Illinois Science Technology Coalition

Research and development (R&D) is the lifeblood of innovation. Universities, businesses, and government all use R&D to create new technologies and services that create jobs and drive economic growth.

University research has been a core mission of Illinois’ leading universities since their founding. Research at universities in the state has led to the creation of technologies such as the LED, graphical web browser, MRI, modern nuclear energy, cloud computing, countless modern medicines and cancer treatments, and many, many more. The past decade has seen Illinois’ universities place an increased emphasis on commercializing discoveries made through university research. This emphasis has led Illinois’ universities to become hubs of economic development through the creation and commercialization of new technologies.

 

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Why Venture Capital Is Not for All Entrepreneurs WWD

“Growth capital” provider Clearbanc, which recently raised $250 million in “Fund 3” and $50 million in “Series B,” has invested in more than 800 brands including Public Goods, Le Tote and Leesa Sleep, among others, and is on track to collectively generate $1 billion in sales this year.

Image: Michele Romanow CBC Media.

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initiative

Proactive workers are in high demand, and it’s easy to understand why. When it comes to creating positive change, these employees don’t need to be told to take initiative. Research confirms that, compared with their more passive counterparts, proactive people are better performers, contributors, and innovators.

 

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NewImage

Successful startups seem to follow similar paths to greatness, and unfortunately all too often that path leads them back down the hill much faster than they went up. Big company powerhouses, like IBM and Xerox, took fifty years to make the cycle, but new companies today, in the age of the Internet, often make the cycle in five to ten years, or even less. Consider MySpace and Webvan.

 

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NewImage

The future of healthcare is precision medicine—with the potential to revolutionise healthcare and move from a one-size-fits-all approach to an individualised one, precision medicine is viewed as an emblem of a new age. 

LSIPR has discovered the top things you must consider when looking to protect your inventions in the US and/or Europe, plus one issue which matters wherever you are in the world.

 

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Brian Bergstein

The 19th-century villa, glass-walled conservatory, and gardens of the Carlsberg Academy in Copenhagen is hallowed ground in the history of science. It was originally the home of J.C. Jacobsen, founder of the Carlsberg brewery. Jacobsen decreed that the property should become “an honorary residence for a man or woman engaged in science, literature, or art.”

From 1932 to 1962, that resident was Niels Bohr, the Nobel Prize-winning Danish physicist who worked out how quantum mechanics determines the structure of atoms. This is where Bohr strolled and conferred with luminaries of science like Albert Einstein, Werner Heisenberg, and J. Robert Oppenheimer, discussing the essential physics problems that provided the groundwork for the nuclear age.

 

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plastic

SCIENTISTS HAVE BEGUN to expose a global horror show: microplastic pollution. Tiny bits of plastic have been showing up in unlikely places, including Arctic ice floes. The particles are blowing in the air, so we’re breathing microplastic and eating it and drinking plastic-infused water.

The implications for human health are potentially huge. Potentially. The problem is that little is known about how microplastics affect the human body. That makes things difficult for the World Health Organization, which today released an exhaustive report on the state of research on microplastics in drinking water. The takeaway: As the limited science stands now, there’s no evidence that drinking microplastics is a threat to human health.

 

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